Paul Newman
An Almost Human Fan Site
A Legend For All-Time
January 26, 1925 - September 26, 2008


Last updated: June 7, 2016 | Open Since: July 5, 2004 | Email Us: Here | Free Email

Poll Question

Of those listed below, which is your favorite Paul Newman character?

Judge Roy Bean
Butch Cassidy
Cool Hand Luke
Hud Bannon
Fast Eddie Felson
Reg Dunlop

Results So Far
Submit your own poll question for other fans to vote on. Click here!
Paul Newman
Birth Name: Paul Leonard Newman
Date of birth: January, 26, 1925
Birth Place: Shaker Heights, OH USA
Height: 5' 9" (1.75 m)

Movies
Mailing List

Custom Search


Champ Car
Biography
Biography
Filmography
Trivia
Quotes
Awards
Salary
FAQ's

Photos

1 - 15
16 - 30
31 - 45
46 - 60
61 - 72
- - - - - - - - - -
Add A Pic

Polls

Theme Song
Hunk Of The Month
Top 10 Movies
Top 5 Actors
Top 10 Hunks
Best Abs
Best Eyes
Best Hair
Best Smile

Merchandise

Paul Newman
Joanne Woodward
Posters

Links

Newman's Own
Newman-Haas
Hole In The Wall Camps
Champ Car
Paul Newman
Joanne Woodward


Various

Sponsors

Upcoming Appearances / Movies Openings

  • IndyCar
  • New- The Paul Newman Collection (DVD)
  • New- Cars (DVD)
  • New- Empire Falls (DVD)
  • New Book- Shameless Exploitation in Pursuit of the Common Good
  • 2007 Champ Car Schedule
  • NEWS

    (Click Here to submit news, articles & rumors)

    Why I Care: Rahal follows charitable examples set by parents, Newman

    When it comes to role models in racing who help you learn about the importance of giving back to society, Graham Rahal certainly had it better than most.

    After getting a primer on charitable work from his parents at home, Rahal found himself watching one of racing's most successful philanthropists, late actor Paul Newman, when he broke into Indy car racing in 2007.

    “When I talked to Paul about all the things he had done, it was crazy. He raised a ridiculous amount of money for charity – it was absolutely phenomenal,” said Rahal, driver of the No. 15 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing and son of three-time Indy car champion Bobby Rahal.

    “Paul wasn't a (Microsoft founder) Bill Gates where he made billions and just donated it. He went out and fought for it and got it. I tell everybody, ‘When you go to the grocery store, buy Newman's Own products because that money goes to help kids in need and there's nothing better to support than that.’”

    The late Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing co-owner and film star's Newman's Own brand has donated more than $460 million to charity since 1982. Newman used funds from his food product lines to establish the “Hole in the Wall Gang Camp” in 1988, which offered children fighting serious illnesses an opportunity to forget about their medical battles for a while and, as Newman put it, “raise a little hell.”

    Named after the hideout used by Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid – the pair made famous in the film of the same name starring Newman and Robert Redford – the first camp transformed into a network with a global reach. Now known as the Serious Fun Children's Network, there are 30 camps around the world that have welcomed about 500,000 kids in the past two decades.

    After seeing the Hollywood star’s charity lose momentum in motorsports after Newman passed away in 2008, the Rahal felt compelled to act.

    “Everything in his life was about laughing and smiling. When he was here, Hole in the Wall Camps was always involved in Indy car and always a part of it, and when he passed, it kind of disappeared in 2009 and that really ticked me off. I took it personally and that's why I started my foundation,” Rahal said.

    “I choose the causes based on Paul Newman because of the opportunities in life that he gave me, among others. Typically, it's all focused on kids and helping those in need.”

    Rahal also got a good dose of civic responsibility from parents who have been hugely involved in helping good causes over the years. His 1986 Indianapolis 500-winning father works tirelessly to raise money for the Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, through the Bobby Rahal Foundation.

    One of the world's leading children's hospitals, it features the Bobby and Debi Rahal Bone Marrow Transplant Wing in recognition of his parents’ fundraising efforts and donations.

    “I grew up with four healthy kids in my family, with great parents, financial stability and a nice home and all those sorts of things, but not everybody gets that,” Graham said. “I have always felt that it's my job, as it was my parents' to give back and help improve the lives of others who haven't been so fortunate. It's a big part of my life.

    “The foundation is just myself and one or two other people who help run it in their spare time. We have raised a couple million dollars, but I'd like to see it grow and get my wife (NHRA drag racer Courtney Force) further involved. Courtney is about the most passionate person I have seen with kids and I think together we could do a lot.”

    In addition to the Serious Fun Network, money raised by the Graham Rahal Foundation (www.grahamrahal.com/foundation) goes to Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer. Alex's Lemonade Stand started in 2000 when 4-year-old cancer patient Alexandra Scott sold drinks on her front lawn to help raise money to help find a cure for the disease. It quickly grew into a national charity and, before she died in 2004, the lemonade stands had raised more than $1 million.

    Rahal has also been front and center when tragedy struck the INDYCAR paddock. Following the deaths of Dan Wheldon in 2011 and Justin Wilson last year, Rahal moved quickly in support of the fallen drivers' families.

    Soon after Wheldon lost his life in an accident during the 2011 season finale, Rahal organized an online auction of sports memorabilia that raised $630,000 to help Dan’s wife Susie and his sons Sebastian and Oliver. A similar effort following Wilson's death in 2015 saw almost $640,000 go to Justin’s wife Julia and daughters Jessica and Jane.

    “They were two great guys and better people than they were competitors, which says a lot,” Rahal said. “It was my job to help them and take care of them.”

    “Justin had more of an effect on my life than any other driver. He was my teammate when I was a kid (2008 at Newman/Haas/Lanigan), and I never learned so much than I did from that guy. He was totally selfless and just wanted to help mold me, I felt, and who could just make me a better driver and tougher competitor.”

    Graham is also helping military veterans with every race lap he turns in 2016. United Rentals, one of Rahal Letterman Lanigan’s sponsors, announced last week that it would donate $50 for every lap he completes this season to Turns for Troops (www.turnsfortroops.com), a program with the non-profit organization SoldierStrong dedicated to helping veterans who sustained major injuries while serving their country.

    With Rahal totaling 951 laps completed at the midpoint of the season, the initiative has already raised $47,550.

    “Being an American and as passionate as I am about supporting the military in general, without a doubt, it feels good,” Rahal said. “Anything that we can do to help veterans is key.”

    Wealth of racing and other memorabilia added to online auction benefiting Wilson Children’s Fund

    A wealth of racing and other memorabilia has been added to the eBay online auction benefiting the Wilson Children’s Fund.

    Items available for bid include donations from Formula One, NASCAR, sports car and Global Rallycross drivers and teams, the USA Soccer men’s national team, National Football League players and the entertainment world, as well as additional items submitted by Verizon IndyCar Series drivers and teams.

    To view the current list of items for bid, go to http://stores.ebay.com/Celebrity-Charity-Auctions/Justin-Wilson-Memorial.

    All proceeds from the auction go to the fund for the family of Verizon IndyCar Series driver Justin Wilson, who died Aug. 24 after suffering a head injury in a race the day before. The first group of auction items consisted of signed racing helmets donated by 19 Verizon IndyCar Series drivers and racing legend Mario Andretti. The helmet worn by 2015 series champion Scott Dixon went for more than $18,000 when its auction concluded Sept. 22. The remaining helmets are available for bidding through 9 p.m. ET Sept. 24.

    The new group of auction items, 78 items in all, is available for bidding through the evening of Sept. 28. Among the highlight items, by category, are:

    Formula One: Fernando Alonzo’s race-worn firesuit, shoes and gloves from the 2015 Austrian Grand Prix, Jenson Button’s race-worn helmet and Daniel Ricciardo’s race-worn firesuit;
    NASCAR: autographed firesuits, hats, gloves, visors and more from the likes of Jeff Gordon, Dale Earnhardt Jr., Jimmie Johnson, Brad Keselowski, Michael Waltrip and many others;
    Sports cars: the firesuit worn by race winner Jordan Taylor at this year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans;
    USA Soccer: jerseys signed by recently retired Landon Donovan, goalkeeper Brad Guzan and one signed by the entire men’s national team;
    NFL: footballs signed by Hall of Famer Walter Payton and Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith, and a jersey signed by Dallas Cowboys tight end Jason Witten;
    Entertainment: a Roger Daltrey-autographed microphone used at The Who’s concert this year at the Glastonbury Festival; a framed 1982 Hall & Oates “Private Eyes” Australian gold record, signed by John Oates; and a 14-by-11 “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” movie reprint photo signed by the late Paul Newman;
    Verizon IndyCar Series: the racing helmet used by Stefan Wilson when he drove as a teammate to brother Justin at Baltimore in 2013; helmets worn by Will Power, Pippa Mann, Tristan Vautier, Sarah Fisher, Stefano Coletti and Carlos Huertas; a Marco Andretti race-worn firesuit; one-of-a-kind, signed San Francisco Giants baseball jerseys with the last names and car numbers of 2015 championship contenders Scott Dixon, Juan Pablo Montoya, Graham Rahal, Helio Castroneves and Josef Newgarden embroidered on the back; and a Giants baseball jersey with “Wilson” and “25” on the back to represent Justin’s car number, signed by all the drivers who competed in the season-ending GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma.

    “We’ve had a great response for the first batch of items,” said Rahal, who has spearheaded the auction effort through eBay, Auction Cause and the Graham Rahal Foundation. “The helmets all went through the roof and, Monday night, we had a great bunch of new items go up. … There’s a lot of ball caps and items from The Who, UFC, footballs, hockey stuff. People need to take another look and see what they can find.

    “It’s going good. I’m proud of the effort that everybody has put in and can’t thank everyone enough for getting us this far down the road.”

    Fans can sell their own Wilson-related items on eBay and designate the Graham Rahal Foundation as their chosen charity, with proceeds also donated to the Wilson Children’s Fund.

    Additionally, a limited edition reproduction of 50 signed and numbered prints of noted artist Bill Patterson’s original work depicting Wilson’s final Indy car victory at Texas Motor Speedway in 2012 – painted live Aug. 31 at the Verizon IndyCar Series Championship Celebration – are available at http://billpatterson.com/justin-wilson-memorial-print, with $100 of each print sold contributed to the fund.

    Tribute T-shirts are available at http://shop.ims.com/indycar/drivers/justin-wilson/, with proceeds also directed to the fund.

    Contributions can be made directly to the fund at http://justinwilson.co.uk/donate or by mail to: Wilson Children’s Fund, c/o Forum Credit Union, PO Box 50738, Indianapolis, IN 46250-0738.

    The Indianapolis Motor Speedway will host "Celebrating the Life of Justin Wilson," to honor Wilson’s memory, from 4-6 p.m. ET Sept. 29. The event is open only to members of the racing community and invited media, but fans can watch via live streaming on IndyCar.com.

    Paul Newman’s family at odds with Newman’s Own honcho

    Paul Newman’s daughter Susan has slammed the exec her father left in charge of his famed food company and foundation, Newman’s Own.

    “I will not be muzzled any longer,” she declares in Vanity Fair’s August issue about Robert Forrester, Newman’s longtime friend and adviser who took charge of Newman’s Own after the star’s death, in 2008.

    “Some family members may be angry at me for speaking out, but I feel like the Newman family has been taken hostage by Bob Forrester,” she further told Mark Seal.

    The bitter battle stems in part from a dispute over Newman’s will, which was amended a dozen times. Susan, who has four sisters, claims, “I was told each daughter would inherit a million dollars .?.?. and my father would set up foundations for each of us .?.?. funded with up to $30 million or more per daughter.”

    She also claims the sisters were to serve on Newman’s Own board. But, “We had the rug pulled out from under us.”

    Forrester counters: “Paul never thought of Newman’s Own as a family enterprise .?.?. At one time, he was giving some thought to having one daughter on each board serving a time-limited term, but ultimately decided against doing so.” And, “Everything we are doing today is in line with Paul’s way of doing things.”

    Newman’s widow, Joanne Woodward, did not comment for the story.

    Renée Zellweger, Annette Bening, More Celeb Supporters Step Out at Charity Gala Honoring Paul Newman

    Renée Zellweger looked radiant Thursday as she joined other stars in honoring the legacy of Paul Newman at a Los Angeles gala for the late actor's SeriousFun Children's Network charity.

    The actress, 46, was all smiles – in a copper-toned mid-length dress with long sheer sleeves, her hair up in a bun – as she introduced Natalie Cole, who went on to play a three-song set as part of a fun and freewheeling evening.

    Zellweger is not seen at many Hollywood functions these days, but she makes exceptions for charity work. The Oscar winner also attended the ALS Association Golden West Chapter's One Starry Night benefit last month, where she happily chatted about her boyfriend of more than two years, musician Doyle Bramhall II.

    Among the other stars at Thursday's gala were Jamie Foxx, Jay Leno, Michael Keaton, Annette Bening, Danny DeVito, Rhea Pearlman, Carole King, Anjelica Huston and Burt Bacharach.

    Many of them spoke lovingly of Newman, who died in 2008 at age 83, and who was a tireless advocate for sick children. The mood was celebratory, just as it was at SeriousFun's New York City gala in March, where George Clooney and others recalled Newman's charm and generosity.

    "Tonight is really about Paul Newman. And Paul Newman, what a giant," Bening, 56, said on the red carpet. "I met him at one of the first events I went to for these camps. It was a small dinner, and I got to sit next to him. And he was so charming. He was so handsome, but he was also modest and had true humility."

    "First of all, best blue eyes in the world," added Huston, 63, with a laugh. Of his charitable work, she observed: "It's a very quiet but very meaningful legacy. What he did was without fanfare."

    The evening also featured many special kids from SeriousFun, along with performances by King and Bacharach and a big sing-along to Katy Perry's "Roar" led by DeVito, Bening, Zellweger and Huston.

    Paul Newman Racing Doc 'Winning' Lands TrueCar As Sponsor

    TrueCar, the negotiation-free car buying and selling mobile marketplace, is partnering with comedian and car aficionado Adam Carolla to sponsor the documentary Winning: The Racing Life of Paul Newman directed by Carolla and Nate Adams.

    Winning –which takes its name from Newman’s 1969 sports film– follows the Oscar-winning actor’s obsession with auto-racing as seen through on-and-off-the track footage and interviews with Newman, his wife Joanne Woodward as well as Tom Cruise, Robert Redford, Robert Wagner and Patrick Dempsey. Famed racers Mario Andretti, Michael Andretti, Sebastien Bourdais and Graham Rahal are also featured. Jay Leno, who appears in the film, exclaimed “This is the best racing documentary I’ve ever seen.”

    Winning made its world premiere last month at Hollywood’s El Capitan Theater, prior to the Long Beach Grand Prix Weekend. Special screenings kick off in 10 cities on May 8 ahead of the film’s May 22 premiere at the Imax Theater Indiana State Museum in Indianapolis, IN, an event which is part of the Indy 500 festivities. The doc can also be downloaded at iTunes. Winning will be playing at the following theaters from May 8-14: Atlanta, GA (Plaza Theater); Boise, ID (The Flicks Boise); Cleveland, OH (Tower City Cinemas); Denver, CO (The Kress Cinema); Detroit, MI (Cinema Detroit); Los Angeles, CA (Laemmle’s NoHo 7); Millerton, NY (The Moviehouse); Philadelphia, PA (The Roxy Theater); Seattle, WA (Dragonfly Cinema) and Tampa, FL (Cinema 6).

    Along with TrueCar, Nissan Motor Co. and sports apparel maker Spyder are also presenting sponsors for Winning. True Car’s involvement also includes a contribution to Newman’s Racing for Cancer initiative.

    Star gazing at the premiere of Newman racing documentary

    Verizon IndyCar Series stars mixed with Hollywood’s racing- and car-loving celebrities during the charity premiere of the documentary “Winning: The Racing Life of Paul Newman” on April 16 at the El Capitan Theatre.

    Sebastien Bourdais, who won a history-making four consecutive Indy car championships for the Oscar-winning actor's team and appeared in the documentary, attended, as did Graham Rahal, who was also in the film. Rahal was 19 when he became the youngest winner in Indy car history while racing for Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing in 2008.

    Others in the VIP audience included Michael Andretti, who won an Indy car championship for Newman’s team in 1991; Justin Wilson, who brought Newman his final victory in 2008; Oriel Servia, another of his race winners; James Hinchcliffe, who drove for Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing in 2011; and Simon Pagenaud.

    Although the premiere included the usual glamour that comes with Hollywood events – a red carpet entrance, lots of picture-taking and the opportunity to rub shoulders with celebrities ("Bachelor" couple Chris Soules and Whitney Bischoff were there, as was Jimmy Kimmel, whose theater is next door to the El Capitan.) – it was clear that the audience was focused on the documentary, which was produced by Newman fan and car lover Adam Carolla, who also attended. Actor and racer Patrick Dempsey, who appears in the documentary, was there, too, as was Ronn Moss, who played Ridge Forrester on the soap opera “The Bold and the Beautiful.”

    Another collection of stars is expected for a second premiere in Indianapolis on May 22, two days before the 99th Running of the Indianapolis 500. It also opens in selected theaters nationwide that day and in video-on-demand format.

    Rahal looking forward to documentary on his 'hero'

    (Trailer) Graham Rahal is succinct in describing his admiration for Paul Newman.

    “He’s my hero. I really think Paul Newman is the standard for what a human being should be,” Rahal said.

    Newman, who died in September 2008, was a mentor and friend to the teenage Rahal, who broke into Indy car racing in 2007 with Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing.

    “I don’t think enough people give him credit for everything he did accomplish, all that he’s done for charity and his passion for Indy car racing in particular,” Rahal continued. “He and Carl (Haas) and Mike Lanigan gave me my first shot professionally and were loyal to me.”

    On April 16, Rahal will attend the charity premiere of “Winning: The Racing Life of Paul Newman” -- a documentary showcasing Newman’s 35 years as both a prolific driver and owner -- at the El Capitan Theater in Los Angeles. It was directed by radio personality Adam Carolla and Nate Adams. Featured in the film are Newman’s wife, Joanne Woodward, Robert Redford, Robert Wagner, Patrick Dempsey, Jay Leno, Mario Andretti, Michael Andretti, Sebastien Bourdais, Tom Cruise and Rahal.

    Celebrities featured on the red carpet (6 p.m. local) include Jimmy Kimmel, Peter Fonda, James Marsden, Sean Patrick Flanery, Neal McDonough, Maya Stojan, Harland Williams, Chris McDonald, Trevor Donova, Dempsey and Verizon IndyCar Series drivers.

    “He was an incredible man and somebody we all look up to,” Rahal said. “I’m looking forward to seeing the documentary; I’m sure Adam Carolla has done a great job.”

    Newman became interested in auto racing while training at Watkins Glen Racing School for the 1969 feature film “Winning.” His first professional event as a racer was in 1972 at Thompson International Speedway, and he was a frequent competitor in Sports Car Club of American events. He won four national championships.

    Founded in 1983 with Carl Haas, Newman/Haas Racing scored 107 Indy car wins, 109 poles and secured eight driver championships with drivers Mario Andretti (1984), Michael Andretti (1991), Nigel Mansell (1993), Cristiano da Matta (2002) and Sebastien Bourdais (2004, 2005, 2006 and ‘07).

    In 2008 at St. Petersburg, Rahal became the youngest winner of an Indy car race (19 years, 93 days) in a Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing entry. Lanigan became a co-owner in 2007.

    Rahal also was impacted by Newman’s philanthropy. The Graham Rahal Foundation was founded in 2009 to support Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation and SeriousFun Children’s Network, which Newman founded.

    “Everything that I carried on and everything that we do with my foundation is simply to carry on Paul’s tradition,” he said. “I love giving back and love to pay it forward. Paul Newman is the one who inspired me to do so.”

    Another charity screening of the film is scheduled for May 22 in Indianapolis in conjunction with the Indianapolis 500. All proceeds from ticket sales will benefit Racing For Cancer and The Indy Family Foundation.

    New book gives inside scoop on old Hollywood

    Joan Kramer and David Heeley — an Emmy-winning duo behind docs on Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Fred Astaire and many more — dish on old Hollywood in the new tome, “In the Company of Legends.”

    Kramer recalls how Paul Newman was constantly pranking her over years of working together.

    “I’ve often called the Newmans at their homes,” Kramer recalls, and, “Unlike so many big stars, they usually answered their own phone .?.?. The first voice I’d hear would be Paul’s.”

    In 1983, Kramer dialed Newman’s wife, Joanne Woodward, but “before I’d caught on to his deviousness, [Paul] said, ‘Joanne’s not here. She’s in Calcutta — playing in summer stock.’”

    Kramer said she thought Woodward didn’t like to fly.

    “She will if I’m with her,” the “Cool Hand Luke” star explained, “So I took her on my plane and I’ll pick her up in about three weeks and bring her home.”

    He said Woodward didn’t mind the Calcutta heat in July because she grew up in Georgia.

    Another time, Newman answered and told Kramer “through clenched teeth,” “I told you never to call me at this number. She’s home. Meet me on Route 6, motel room number five. The key’ll be under the mat.”

    She then heard Woodward laughing in the background.

    For a 1987 film on James Stewart, Heeley asked the “It’s a Wonderful Life” star, who was a brigadier general in the Air Force Reserve, “Can you describe for me a typical day when you were the lead pilot in a [WWII] bombing mission ?”

    Stewart “looked directly at me without smiling and said, ‘No.’ That was it. No explanation. Just one word: ‘No.’?”

    Another producer later warned Heeley, “Yes, he’s wonderful to work with, and yes, most of the time he’s quiet and gentle. But don’t f–k with him.”

    The Beaufort Books tome is out April 16.

    'A Walk In The Woods' Gala Evokes Paul Newman & "Generosity" - Sundance

    A certain Academy Award winner was very much in the house in Salt Lake City tonight. Both Robert Redford and Nick Nolte evoked the words and spirit of Paul Newman at the Sundance Film Festival’s A Walk In The Woods gala. “I asked Bob what he thought was the great thing about Paul, and he said his generosity,” Nolte told a packed Rose Wagner Theatre after the screening.

    Noting that Newman had once told him how similar he and Redford were, the actor added, “I miss Paul; I still do.” A castmate of Redford’s in Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid and The Sting, Newman died in September 2008.

    The mentioning of Newman tonight was rather fitting as he originally was intended for the role Nolte plays in the film. Soon after optioning Bill Bryson’s 1998 book of the same name over a decade ago, Redford wanted to team up a third time with Newman on the big-screen adaptation. However, years of hurdles getting the film made and the actor’s declining health eventually made Redford and Newman reunion in A Walk In The Woods a non-starter.

    “There’s nothing I think stronger than generosity when an actor works with another actor,” the Sundance founder told the audience, picking up on Nolte’s remarks about Newman. While a presence at every Sundance since the start, A Walk In The Woods is the first film Redford has had in the festival since 2004’s The Clearing.

    Directed by Ken Kwapis and shot mainly in Atlanta, A Walk In The Woods follows two old and estranged friends tackling the Appalachian Trail and some hard truths about growing old. While the film officially had its first screening earlier in the day in Park City, the SLC gala was the first attended by the cast and crew, as Sundance is steadily making Utah’s largest city part of its annual fest. Kwaois, Bryson, co-star Nick Offerman and the film’s producers joined Redford and Nolte onstage for a brief Q&A after the screening. Fellow co-stars Emma Thompson and Mary Steenburgen were not in attendance.

    RCR wins #TBT with Paul Newman, Childress photo

    (Photo) It was a morning just like any other.

    I was minding my own business, researching Ryan Newman stats and drinking my morning coffee when I stumbled upon something super interesting.

    Legendary film star and humanitarian Paul Newman was heavily involved in NASCAR and auto racing in general and used to drive race cars competitively -- doing so as recently as nine years ago, before his death in 2008.

    Perhaps it's blind ignorance on my part that I was unaware of this, but I felt that this is worth sharing for anyone else who didn't realize the Academy Award-winning actor was just as comfortable on black asphalt as he was on the silver screen.

    Newman competed in four NASCAR Rolex Grand-Am Sports Car Series events from 2000 to 2005, with his final start coming at the age of 80 (80!). In the 1995 24 Hours of Daytona at 70 years and 8 days old, he won in his class and became the oldest driver to be part of a winning team in a major sanctioned race.

    Yes, the Oscar-winner for best actor in "The Color of Money" was just as successful in a completely different walk of life. Paul Newman was superhuman. (And have you tried his pineapple salsa?)

    He also narrated the 2007 film "Dale," which chronicled the life and career of NASCAR Hall of Famer Dale Earnhardt.

    A pair of tweets sent out Thursday morning then netted an even cooler find, after Richard Childress Racing's Manager of Digital and Social Media Jeff O'Keefe got involved and promised what was sure to be an awesome Throwback Thursday photo.

    O'Keefe didn't disappoint.

    Richard Childress! With Paul Newman! And five-time Sprint Cup Series winner Dave Marcis!

    The picture shows the trio in the Cup garage at a race in the late 1990s and is just the coolest.

    So congrats to RCR on winning Throwback Thursday this week.

    Cannes festival tribute for Woodward and Newman

    The 66th Cannes Film Festival will pay tribute to Joanne Woodward and Paul Newman, who starred in many films together, including "The Long, Hot Summer," which won Newman a best actor award at the festival 55 years ago.

    On Thursday, Cannes President Gilles Jacob announced this year's nominees for the festival standing beneath a photo of the married couple taken during their filming of "A New Kind of Love" in 1963.

    The festival said the image is an opportunity "both to pay tribute to the memory of Paul Newman, who passed away in 2008, and to mark its undying admiration for Joanne Woodward, his wife and most favored co-star." It said, "The vision of these two lovers caught in a vertiginous embrace, oblivious of the world around them, invites us to experience cinema with all the passion of an everlasting desire."

    Last year, to celebrate 65th anniversary, the official Cannes logo featured a demure Marilyn Monroe blowing out a candle on a birthday cake.

    Cannes Unveils Poster For 66th Edition Featuring Joanne Woodward & Paul Newman

    (Photo) The Cannes Film Festival takes great pride in unveiling the official poster each year and has increasingly relied on iconic images to set the tone for the event. For 2012's 65th edition, Marilyn Monroe blew out a candle on a birthday cake; the year before it was Faye Dunaway shot by Jerry Schatzberg in 1970 when they made Puzzle Of A Downfall, and in 2009 Monica Vitti was spotted from behind in a scene from Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’Avventura. This year, Joanne Woodward and Paul Newman — “a couple who embody the spirit of cinema like no other” — grace the affiche officielle. The shot was taken in 1963 during the filming of Melville Shavelson’s A New Kind Of Love. “It is a chance both to pay tribute to the memory of Paul Newman, who passed away in 2008, and to mark its undying admiration for Joanne Woodward, his wife and most favored co-star,” the festival said. Both Woodward and Newman were in Cannes in 1958, the year they got married, for the official competition selection of Martin Ritt’s The Long Hot Summer, the first film in which they appeared together. Newman’s directorial efforts in which Woodward starred, The Effect Of The Gamma Rays On Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds (1973) and The Glass Menagerie (1987), were also both in competition. Paris-based The Bronx agency is responsible for all the graphics of the 2013 festival which runs May 15-26.

    Newman's O

    Late acting legend Paul Newman loomed large at Harvey Weinstein’s Connecticut fund-raiser for President Obama this week. The star’s widow, Joanne Woodward, was a guest, and food was provided by Newman’s own Westport restaurant, the Dressing Room. “Joanne was heard telling the president, ‘If Paul were still alive, he’d be here tonight. He was always a huge supporter of yours,’ ” a spy told us. And when asked who he expected would be Mitt Romney’s running mate, rather than dodge the question, Obama wrongly guessed “Tim Pawlenty,” explaining he believed Republicans would go for a safe choice. Also at the shindig were Anne Hathaway, Aaron Sorkin, Olivia Munn and Marlo Thomas.

    Trisha Yearwood To Perform At 'A Celebration of Paul Newman's Dream'

    Trisha Yearwood will be among the artists and celebrities gathering at New York’s Avery Fisher Hall in support of Paul Newman’s Association of Hole in the Wall Camps on April 2nd. ‘A Celebration of Paul Newman’s Dream,’ will feature performances from Trisha, Josh Groban, Paul Simon and additional musical performances with appearance by Jake Gyllenhall and Jimmy Fallon. Paul’s wife, Joanne Woodward, will host the evening.

    “This is the legacy of my husband, Paul, and he considered it to be his most important one,” Joanne said. “It is for that very reason that I find this delicate way, in my best manners, to ask friends and supporters to come together to help raise money – it’s about helping the children who need it.”

    The Association of Hole in the Wall Camps is a global community of camps and programs for children with serious illnesses and their families. There are 14 member camps worldwide, including eight in the United States, five in Europe and one in Israel, as well as 10 programs in Africa, Asia and South America. Since 1988, more than 350,000 children and families from 50 countries have been served. For more information, please visit http://www.holeinthewallcamps.org.

    The 2010 Celebration of Paul Newman’s Hole in the Wall Camps raised more than $3 million with the support of Renee Zellweger, Bette Midler, Bill Cosby, Stevie Wonder, John Mellencamp, Emmylou Harris, Lyle Lovett and many more.

    Show-only tickets begin at $35 and are on sale through the Lincoln Center Box Office. Benefit tickets including a post-performance supper begin at $1,500 and are on sale through the benefit office at 212-245-6570 or rachelg@eventassociatesinc.com.

    Paul Newman's Volkswagen Beetle once rocked the motor racing world

    The red 1963 Volkswagen convertible in the "For Sale" ad appears to be a cherry version of the automaker's popular Beetle. It has chrome bumpers, a black cloth top and a bright finish to its paint. The rims are shiny and the tires barely worn.

    The trim little California car looks ready to drive to the beach or cruise down the Sunset Strip on a Saturday night. But buckle your seatbelt before you get to the asking price — $250,000.

    Obviously, this is no ordinary Volkswagen. Indeed, it has an extraordinary history. In car talk circles, it's known as the Newman Bug, the VW that the late Paul Newman had customized into a "sleeper" racecar in the late 1960s.

    It's an Indy Bug with a 300-horsepower engine, racing suspension and five-speed gearbox. On the outside, it looks like Herbie the "Love Bug." But try to beat it off the line and it will blow off your door handles.

    Newman bought the car in 1963, and later he and the convertible appeared in some magazine advertisements for Volkswagen. In 1969, he asked Jerry Eisert, a renowned Indy Car builder in Costa Mesa, to make some modifications on the car, which included installing a bigger motor.

    Eisert took out the backseat and replaced the stock VW motor with a Ford 351-cubic-inch engine — the equivalent of putting a rocket on a kid's red wagon. After Eisert's work was complete, Hollywood gossip had Newman racing the car on Mulholland Drive with some of his industry pals and also competing against all comers at local racetracks. Cool Hand Bug.

    Newman's passion for racing blossomed after he made the 1969 film "Winning," and the experience of learning how to drive for that movie turned into a second career. For the next 15 years, he was a successful driver on the Sports Car Club of America circuit and, driving a Porsche, finished second at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1979.

    Newman once told ESPN, "It actually took me three years of rearranging my schedule before I could find time to get my license and everything. After that, I never did a film between April and September or October. [Racing] was all I did."

    In preparation for "Winning," Newman and the film's co-star, Robert Wagner, took lessons at Bob Bondurant's driving school at Riverside Raceway. Soon after, Bondurant moved the school to Ontario Motor Speedway, and it was there one night in 1969 that Newman met Sam Contino, head of the automotive technology department at Chaffey College in Alta Loma.

    Contino and his students were testing a car they had built — a Trans-American Sedan Series Camaro — as part of their "race car preparation technology" class, a three-unit course.

    According to Contino, that night John DeLorean brought a new 1969 Camaro to the track for Bondurant, and Newman, who was on the speedway's board of directors, was putting a Formula Four open-wheel racer through its paces.

    When Newman saw Contino and the students, he introduced himself.

    "He looked at our Trans-Am Camaro and asked if he could drive it," Contino, 82, recently recalled. "After he drove it, he said, 'I'd like to show you one of my toys.'"

    That's when the Chaffey class first saw the Newman Bug.

    Newman told Bondurant that he was thinking of giving up the Volkswagen, but didn't know what to do with it. Bondurant suggested that he donate it to Chaffey's auto tech department.

    "He said, 'It's yours if you want it,'" Contino said. "I had gotten some Chaffey jackets from the football team for our students to wear and we gave him a jacket." From then on, Newman was a sponsor of the Chaffey program.

    The class added the Newman Bug to its collection of cars, which included a Trans-Am Boss 302 Mustang and two Ramblers that had been part of the James Garner Racing Team. The class turned one of the Ramblers into a Baja car for competition in Mexico road races and the other into a dragster.

    They painted the VW the Chaffey school colors, white with red trim, and put on four Keystone chrome rims. Although they prepared the car for racing, it was used mostly as a training aid to show workmanship and construction.

    In 1986, Contino retired from teaching at Chaffey and the school presented him the Newman Bug as a retirement gift. Contino and his son, Tom, did a complete restoration of the car in April 2009 and had plans to show it to Newman. But the actor died before the car was finished.

    "The car is a tribute to Paul Newman for all that he did for us," Sam Contino said.

    The Newman Bug was recently shown at the Long Beach Grand Prix, where it drew sizable crowds. "People look at it from a distance and think it's just a Volkswagen," Contino said, "but then they get closer and see the big Ford motor where the back seat should be, and it blows their minds."

    Mostly, though, the car sits in Tom Contino's garage in Hesperia, awaiting a new owner.

    "Sometimes I drive it around the block," Tom Contino said, "and my wife will take it out for ice cream."

    Sam Contino said he hopes a car collector will buy it. Or, if a museum was interested, "I would be willing to give it up."

    Paul Newman Called Elizabeth Taylor 'a Helluva Actress'

    Superstar to superstar. To Paul Newman, Elizabeth Taylor was "a functioning voluptuary … a courageous survivor, a helluva actress and someone I am extremely proud to know."

    Even in the sanitized 1958 MGM version of Tennessee Williams's potent drama in which they costarred, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof – with the sultry Newman as the drunkard ex-athlete Brick and an indelible Taylor as his neglected wife, Maggie the Cat – the two sent audiences' pulses racing. But they were more than simply sex symbols. Both proved themselves Academy Award-level actors and world-class humanitarians.

    Now, sadly, they are both gone. Newman died at age 83, in 2008, and Taylor, at 79, early Wednesday morning.

    Fortunately, their performances remain – as does a tribute Newman paid Taylor on behalf of Turner Classic Movies. (See the video here.)

    "What can you say about a legend?" Newman muses at the beginning of the four-minute video love letter. Acknowledging but not dwelling upon her remarkable violent eyes or stunning beauty, Newman instead concentrates on her screen presence, "her volatility, her sense of truth."

    "On the screen," he said, "her very presence seemed to radiate charm."

    And while "she practically grew up in front of the camera," Newman noted, "her life has not been an easy or a private one, but a series of tribulations, serious illnesses, senseless tragedy and lost love."

    Left a widow during the making of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof when the private plane carrying her husband, impresario Mike Todd, crashed in New Mexico, Taylor continued acting as Maggie, finding the work therapeutic. "I was overwhelmed with her professionalism," Newman said.

    "One thing for sure: She is not afraid to take chances in front of people. I find a lot of actors who reach the top, they become very protective of themselves, and self-indulgent, but not Elizabeth," added Newman. "I was always staggered by her ferocity."

    Echoing a sentiment that was often said about Taylor – who was unstintingly devoted to friends (and costars) Rock Hudson, Montgomery Clift and Roddy McDowall – Newman said, "Not only is she a phenomenal actress, but she is also a generous human being and one who cherishes and works at her friendships. She gives her talent and her time unselfishly … She has risen above her pain and troubles to help others overcome theirs."

    On Sunday April 10, Turner Classic Movies will present a 24-hour tribute to Elizabeth Taylor, with nine films, including the two for which she won the Best Actress Oscar, 1960's BUtterfield 8 and 1966's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

    Daughter: Newman liked being on Nixon enemies list

    Paul Newman's daughter says her father liked to joke about his trademark blue eyes, musing that if they turned brown his career might be in jeopardy.

    Nell Newman's father died a year ago at age 83. She says he considered himself lucky and wanted to give back, leading to his passion for philanthropy.

    His daughter gave a rare glimpse into the actor's life Monday in an interview with The Associated Press. Her company, Newman's Own Organics, is highlighting its partnership with McDonald's Corp., where it sells coffee.

    She says her father enjoyed practical jokes and liked turning up on President Nixon's enemies list. She says he also preferred the company of race car mechanics to the Beverly Hills jet set.

    Her company and Newman's Own have given $250 million to charities.

    Scott Sharp's Paul Newman Memories

    Scott Sharp has fond memories of Lime Rock Park, and rightfully so, as the Norwalk, Conn.-native literally grew up at the historic Northeast circuit. Watching his Dad's Bob Sharp Racing team compete in SCCA national events as a youngster, Sharp got the racing bug early in life.

    At 17, Sharp began taking part in Tuesday test sessions at Lime Rock in his Dad's SCCA national championship-winning Datsun 240Z. And once Scott began competing in races the following year, it didn't take long for him to reach success.

    "It actually sat in our basement for years," Sharp said of the 240Z, which at the time was 17 years old. "I used to hang around it all the time, opening the doors, and showing it off to my friends. Then, my Dad's team did a little bit of an update to it, and I started driving it. The first year driving it, I won my first SCCA national championship."

    Sharp's maiden title in 1986 was his first of three consecutive national championships, in the midst of the glory years of SCCA GT1 and GT2 competition. While Scott was working up the ladder, he not only looked up to his Dad, but also to a Hollywood legend who also was a quick shoe on the track.

    Paul Newman began racing for BSR in the late '70s and was a fixture with the team for over a decade. In fact, Bob Sharp Racing became known as Newman Sharp Racing in the '80s, when the young Sharp was racking up the wins and national championships.

    "I still have a lot of great memories of Paul," Scott said. "The guy was so personable and a lot of fun to be with. He always had a fun time no matter what he did. If you were with him you of course had a good time as well."

    Sharp and Newman drove together as teammates in Trans-Am in 1989 and 1990 and also raced a handful of times in GT1 and GT2 competition. But most of Sharp's memories of Newman came right at their home track at Lime Rock, putting around during open test sessions.

    "I remember one time we were up there in a regular production Nissan with a roll-cage in it with thin little shaved tires," Scott explained.

    "We were out, and it was raining! We were trying to get tuned up for the end-of-year Runoffs at Road Atlanta. Paul said, 'Hey let's go take this car out.' It then started pouring.

    "I went out and came down the hill and did three 360' spins. I ran off into the mud, luckily didn't hit the wall and had enough of it. I pulled into the pits and Paul decided to take it out.

    "So he gets in and I'm in the passenger seat, and he's just hauling. I'm like, 'wow!' We went down the back straightaway and he just blows by the braking point that I had. All of a sudden, the car doesn't turn, then boom! He pancakes the thing.

    "Laughing our butts off, we drive back to the pits with a totaled car. He was just laughing as he gave the key back to my Dad. We were all standing there stunned, but Paul was just having a good time. That was a great memory."

    Newman, who earned four national titles over the span of a decade, helped mentor drivers like Scott, who were at the time just getting into the sport. He provided a lot of advice, mainly since he had raced many of the cars before, such as the 240Z and 280Z.

    "One thing about Paul is that he was a very smooth driver," Scott said. "To think that he didn't start racing until he was 42 or 43 years old is amazing. As quick as he got, particularly when he was in his 60's, was pretty amazing. If he could have backed that up 20 years, he could have gone very, very far in racing."

    Like the Sharp family, Lime Rock Park was Newman's home track, and his memories will live on for generations to come.

    COUPLE OF JUNKYARD JOKES BETWEEN STARS

    ROBERT Redford and Paul Newman were great pals, but they played some weird practical jokes on each other. "Paul drove me crazy talking about racing all of the time . . . It just bored me to tears . . . So I went to a junkyard and said, 'Do you have a destroyed sports car and can you wrap it up, put a ribbon around it and leave it at Newman's house?' " Redford related to Donny Deutsch, who interviewed him before an audience yesterday at the Hilton New York, where the Oscar winner got a lifetime achievement award from global nonprofit Promax/BDA. Weeks later, Newman retaliated. Redford returned home to find a gigantic box by his door containing the vehicle crushed into a square. Not to be outdone, he had an artist turn the metal heap into a garden sculpture. "It was really awful," recalled Redford, who had the "art" dumped in Newman's yard.

    Julia Roberts Among the Stars for Paul Newman's Charity Fundraiser

    Julia Roberts, Jerry Seinfeld, Robert Redford, Bill Clinton, Harry Connick Jr. and Kristin Chenoweth helped deliver some serious star power to Monday's Lincoln Center gala in New York on behalf of Paul Newman's Hole in the Wall Camps and honor the beloved, late founder of the charity benefiting children with life-threatening medical conditions.

    Among what they had to say about Newman, who died last year, was:

    • "We've done a lot of these galas," Julia Roberts said, after doing a dancing kick line with kids who have attended the camps. "And I've never stood up without my buddy Paul Newman. It seems so much easier to sing and dance and make a fool of yourself when he's right next to you. He encourages fun, more than any person I've ever met. "

    • "I went up to the camp and Paul had me eat my first oyster," Jerry Seinfeld said during a sidesplitting stand-up routine. "I had never had an oyster in my life. And he convinced me to eat one. And it was horrible and it was exciting. And I thought, this will be gross and I'll have a story: I had my first oyster with Paul Newman."

    • Former President Bill Clinton remembered meeting Newman as a "penniless law student" and then recalled his first visit to the first Hole in the Wall Camp in Connecticut as a "penniless governor" of Arkansas. "I have watched it since then," he said, "expand to "Florida, Ireland – which really touched my heart – France, and soon the Middle East." In fact, there are now camps, available to eligible children free of charge, in all 50 states and in 39 countries around the world, says the organization's Web site.

    Harry Connick Jr., who performed "a little New Orleans Boogie Woogie" in Newman's honor, recalled once getting a voicemail from Newman that "changed my whole thing with my wife. I became more eloquent. He was the only guy who could really make you, as a man, feel like total crap. Feel like white trash," Connick Jr. joked, referring to Newman's accomplishments onscreen as well as with his substantial charity work.

    Introducing the event on behalf of Newman's wife Joanne Woodward, Robert Redford, Newman's costar in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Sting, said that "with success comes the pleasure to follow your passion. And Paul had many. Joanne, the girls, the whole family, racing, and salad dressing. I couldn't believe that when I first heard it."

    Paul Newman tribute: Doornbos to run with Hole in the Wall camps logo during Indy 500

    The No. 06 Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing (NHLR) entry in the 2009 Indianapolis 500 for Robert Doornbos will carry the Hole in the Wall Camps (HITWC) logo on its sidepods during the race as a tribute to late team owner Paul Newman, who first took an interest in auto racing while filming the 1968 movie "Winning" at the famed Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

    "I'm honored to have the Hole in the Wall Camps on my race car for the Indy 500," said Doornbos. "The owners decided to run these colors as a tribute to Paul and I am proud to represent such an extraordinary man and the organization he founded to bring happiness to seriously ill children. I met him when I raced against the team in Champ Car and he was one of the first to congratulate me on my win in Mont Tremblant and told me he enjoyed the battle. I know that he was competitive just like me and like everyone at Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing and I will try to do my best to make the Hole in the Wall Camps proud on Sunday.”

    In addition, NHLR driver Graham Rahal announced on Friday the formation of the Graham Rahal Foundation and the commitment to make the Association of Hole in the Wall Camps the primary beneficiary. For more information on the camps, please visit www.holeinthewallcamps.org.

    Newman's secret sex life alleged

    Paul Newman has been "outed" from beyond the grave by Marlon Brando, according to writer Darwin Porter's scandalous new book on the late movie legend.

    Porter interviewed Brando about Newman before the acting great died in 2004 - and he was stunned with what the heavyweight star let slip.

    In his book, Paul Newman: The Man Behind The Baby Blues, he quotes Brando as saying, "He never fooled me. Paul Newman had just as many on-location affairs as the rest of us, and he was just as bisexual as I was. But, where I was always getting caught with my pants down, he managed to do it in the dark."

    Porter tells America's the Globe he has been tracking Newman's secret sexual encounters since he met the actor in 1959 and alleges in his new book the late star, who was happily married to actress Joanne Woodward for 50 years, bedded icons like Grace Kelly, Judy Garland, Natalie Wood and Marilyn Monroe.

    The writer also claims Newman and James Dean had a gay romance.

    But the actor's family has dismissed Porter's book, claiming the sex allegations are "disgusting".

    A source says, "Paul knew there were rumours out there about his sexuality and to have to face them when he's not here to dispute them is Joanne's worst nightmare."

    'Butch & Sundance' top bromance poll

    Paul Newman and Robert Redford have topped a new Internet poll listing the top 10 Movie Bromances of all time.

    The pair's Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid roles beat Lethal Weapon's Murtaugh and Riggs, portrayed by Danny Glover and Mel Gibson, on RoddysRockinReviews.com's online countdown.

    Naming Newman and Redford's portrayals number one, the website claims Butch and Sundance are the "Bromance of Bromances," adding, "When things in their wild world goes awry the two have so much devotion to each other that they face their imminent doom together without even blinking."

    Point Break's Bodhi and Johnny Utah, played by Patrick Swayze and Keanu Reeves, Star Trek's Spock and Captain Kirk and Top Gun's Maverick (Tom Cruise) and Iceman (Val Kilmer) also make the new top 10.

    We Hear...

    THAT Joanne Woodward and the rest of the Paul Newman family will be joined by Robert Redford and Julia Roberts at Lincoln Center on June 8 for a celebration of the late actor's Hole in the Wall camps

    NOT SO COOL SIDE OF NEWMAN

    WAS Cool Hand Luke a hot-headed drunk and womanizer?

    The Post's Kyle Smith reports Shawn Levy's new bio, "Paul Newman: A Life," out next month from Harmony Books, portrays the late Oscar-winner as a functioning alcoholic who, wearing a bottle opener on a chain around his neck, put away "beer after beer after beer, a case or more a day," followed by the hard stuff, usually scotch.

    Onlookers said Newman was seen "drinking beers on the set, in his office, at parties, during interviews, watching TV, getting ready for TV and relaxing after dinner. Mort Sahl recalled him filling a brandy snifter with ice and scotch and sipping it in a steam room. Newman himself joked about drinking even in bed." Preparing for his role as the sozzled detective in "Harper," Newman bragged, "I just got drunk."

    On the set of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," despite his reputation as Hollywood's most faithful husband, Levy relates, Newman had an affair for a year and a half with a journalist who was writing a puff piece on the movie: " 'I finally said to myself, 'I can do better than this,' she remembered. 'I told him, 'You're always drunk, and you can't even make love.' I ended it."

    Newman hated when people asked to see his famous blue eyes. He raged, "There's nothing that makes you feel more like a piece of meat. It's like saying to a woman, 'Open your blouse, I want to see your t - - s."

    Of the rivalry between Newman and Steve McQueen, who was asked to play the "Sundance Kid," Levy writes: "McQueen was a star, but . . . he felt a kind of rivalry with Newman as a real man who didn't stand for Hollywood cant and gloss. [He] got hung up on the fact that Newman, demonstrably a bigger earner . . . would receive billing over him." When he asked for top billing and Newman said no, McQueen walked -- and the part went to Robert Redford.

    Film icon Paul Newman joins Conn. Hall of Fame

    Paul Newman is joining fellow actor Katharine Hepburn, humorist Mark Twain, baseball great Jackie Robinson and others as members of the Connecticut Hall of Fame.

    Newman died in September at age 83. He was a longtime Westport resident and an Oscar-winning star of stage, television and films.

    He also was known as a champion of the underdog. He gave $250 million to charities through his food company and set up camps for severely ill children.

    Newman was inducted into Connecticut's Hall of Fame on Thursday. The president of the Newman's Own Foundation received the award on behalf of Newman and his wife, actress Joanne Woodward.

    U.S. Congress honors late actor Paul Newman

    Paul Newman, who died last September of cancer, was given a posthumous honor on Tuesday as the U.S. House of Representatives approved a resolution recognizing the iconic actor's life and achievements.

    Rep. Steve Cohen, a Democrat from Tennessee, introduced the resolution honoring Newman on the House floor in Washington. Rep. Jim Jordan, a Republican from the actor's native state of Ohio, was among the House members who spoke about Newman.

    "His legendary acting, steely blue eyes, good humor and passion for helping the less fortunate made him one of the most prominent figures in American arts for 40 years," Jordan said.

    In a statement, Cohen called him "a talented artist whose craft has been a part of our American tapestry for over 50 years" and a person who "made the world a better place."

    Newman, who died at age 83, earned nine Oscar nominations and appeared in more than 50 movies including "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof," "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" and "The Sting."

    Aside from auto racing and his commitment to quiet family life outside Hollywood's media glare, Newman was also a noted philanthropist who in 1982 co-founded Newman's Own, a food company that has given more than $250 million to charity.

    The House resolution's approval came two days after Newman was celebrated at the Academy Awards on Sunday, where a video clip of the actor concluded an annual tribute to entertainers who died the year before.

    Stars Pay Tribute to the Legends Who Left Us

    PAUL NEWMAN (Jan. 26, 1925-Sept. 26, 2008)

    After I made Raging Bull, my life and my career were at a low ebb. During that time, I received two unsolicited letters of admiration that meant the world to me. One was from Paul Newman; needless to say, I have always treasured that letter. A few years later, I had a chance to work with him on The Color of Money. He was, as I suspected, a true professional as well as an extremely dedicated artist. I loved him as an actor; I loved him as a man. And I miss him very much. —Martin Scorsese

    Paul Newman's Will Revealed

    To the salad dressing goes the window dressing.

    The details of the late Paul Newman's will have been made public, and reveal to whom—and what—the legendary actor chose to bequeath his belongings.

    While the lion's share of the charitable man's personal possessions were, as expected, left to his wife Joanne Woodward, Newman opted to leave his three Oscars and various other theatrical awards, including an Emmy, three Golden Globes and a Screen Actors Guild Award, among others, to his Newman's Own Foundation.

    According to the will, signed by Newman in Connecticut on April 11 of this year, the actor's "tangible personal property," including real estate holdings, musical instruments and works of art were left to Woodward.

    The widowed actress will also maintain control of Newman's production companies and his various real estate holdings, including the duo's shared home in Westport, Conn.

    The avid driver also instructed that his airplane and race cars be auctioned off to the highest bidder, with proceeds going back to his estate.

    Additionally, the ever-generous actor directed that his interest in the Newman-founded Newman's Own and Salad King companies were to be directed back to his Newman's Own Foundation, which would in turn distribute the profits to charity.

    Newman died of cancer on Sept. 27. He was 83.

    Newman's 18-page last will and testament was first obtained by Radar Online.

    Hollywood's A-list turns out for Newman charity

    A Hollywood who's-who turned out for an annual fundraiser for Paul Newman's children's camp that doubled as a tribute to the late actor.

    The lineup for a dramatic reading of "The World of Nick Adams" on Monday night at San Francisco's Davies Symphony Hall already was set when the acting legend died of cancer Sept. 26 at the age of 83. The event benefited The Painted Turtle, a camp for children with life-threatening illnesses, that was started by Newman in 1999.

    "We expected Paul to be with us and so this kind of turned into kind of a tribute," said Danny Glover, who joined Jack Nicholson, Julia Roberts, Tom Hanks, Warren Beatty, Sean Penn and other big names in the reading. "This is the first time we are doing this without Paul — there is a void there, without a doubt."

    Some 2,500 people attended the star-studded benefit, which began with a video in which Newman discussed his work with the Association of Hole in The Wall Camps, which runs 11 camps around the world including The Painted Turtle.

    "What I was trying to do was acknowledge luck," Newman said in the video narrated by Nicholson. "If you acknowledge it, you have to do something about it — something for the less fortunate."

    There was no mention of Newman during the scripted 90-minute reading, which are the words of Ernest Hemingway adapted for television by A.E. Hotchner, who started the food company Newman's Own with the actor. But after the performance, children from the camp joined the 17 actors on stage as singer Bonnie Raitt performed "Put a Little Love Into Your Heart," which she dedicated to Newman.

    Newman and the Newman's Own brand have given more than $250 million to charity over the years.

    Hanks, who starred with Newman in 2002's "Road to Perdition," remembered him Monday as a down-to-earth actor who was always willing to share the screen.

    "Paul was a member of the ensemble more than anything else," Hanks said. "He didn't care about the hierarchy, but he was a guy, quite frankly, who should have won the Nobel Peace Prize."

    Newman team back in the pits

    One of the most successful teams in auto racing is back in the pits this week for its first race since team founder and actor Paul Newman died last month.

    During Friday’s practice session, the Newman/Haas/Lanigan cars of Justin Wilson and Graham Rahal will feature small decals honoring Newman’s life. They include a logo with “PL,” a nickname by which most of his racing friends knew him, and a reference to him being a “true friend” of racing.

    “We have just a few little things on the cars,” general manager Brian Lisles told The Associated Press in an interview in the team compound at the Indy Racing League’s Indy 300 on Thursday. “Paul was a very low-key person. We’ve paid our respects in our own private way, and that’s the way we wanted to do it.”

    And the Newman/Haas/Lanigan team, which has won 107 races, 107 pole positions and eight driver titles, will continue for 2009 and beyond—without a name change.

    “Purely on the business side, arrangements were made beforehand, that the team name would continue,” Lisles said. “That was talked about by all the partners in the event of any of them no longer being part of the team. Of course, none of us would have it any other way.”

    The team was formed when Newman and Carl Haas, competitors in the Can-Am series, began investigating the possibility of entering a team in the old CART series. It was created in 1982, with Mario Andretti as its driver, and Mike Lanigan joined the team at the start of its 25th season in 2007.

    “The biggest thing was (Newman) was dedicated to the team,” said team manager John Tzouanakis, who has been with the team since the beginning. “And he could come and be left alone. People were always chasing him, wanting pictures of him, autographs.

    “It was his kind of country club, to get away from the hustle-bustle of his life and come to the race track and watch the team perform.”

    Newman’s last race was at Milwaukee in June, and Lisles said most on the team knew the prognosis wasn’t good for their longtime friend.

    “We were well aware of the situation with Paul,” Lisles said. “He came to see us a few times during the past year, and everybody pretty much knew what was going on and what the end game would be.”

    Newman never traveled to Australia with the team, which has six wins, seven poles and 10 podium finishes in 17 years of racing Down Under.

    The American Rahal would like to make it seven Sunday, when organizers plan a special video tribute to Newman and a minute’s silence in his honor.

    “It’s obviously a different atmosphere not having Paul with us,” Rahal said at a driver breakfast Thursday. “Everybody on the team looked at him as a friend more than a team owner. Certainly he is missed, and we are going to be giving it our all for him this weekend.”

    Helping Newman's legacy

    For several years, David and Jenni Belford hosted critically ill youngsters and their families at their farm near Mount Gilead, Ohio. An outing of swimming, horseback riding, boating, games and picnic food was a welcome few hours of laughter and stress relief.

    It also spurred the Belfords to expand the program. It just so happened that 195 acres of gently rolling hills, lakes, woods, meadows and wetlands was adjacent to their property - the ideal setting for a year-round camp modeled after the Hole in the Wall Camps created by Academy Award-winning actor/IndyCar Series team co-owner Paul Newman.

    The idea is becoming reality with Flying Horse Farms scheduled to open in 2010, and it soon will receive a $40,900 donation from IndyCar Series driver Graham Rahal - the proceeds from an eBay auction of a Newman movie poster-themed helmet worn by Rahal in the July race at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course. The helmet is signed by Rahal, designer Troy Lee and Newman, who died Sept. 26 at age 83.

    "I cannot express how happy I am that the helmet auction raised $40,900 for the Flying Horse Farms," said Rahal, 19, driver of the No. 06 Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing car. "Paul Newman set such a tremendous example of the impact that can be made by giving back and doing what you can for others. I hope he would have been proud of what I was able to accomplish with the help of Troy Lee and that this will help Flying Horse Farms move one step closer to being able to bring some happiness to future campers."

    The non-profit organization is working with the Association of Hole in the Wall Camps to become the Midwest's first Hole in the Wall Camp. The Association of Hole in the Wall Camps is a charitable partner of the Indy Racing League and Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Taking its name from the 1969 movie Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, in which Newman played a likable outlaw, the original Hole in the Wall Gang Camp opened in 1988 in Ashford, Conn.

    "If I have a legacy, it will be the camps," Newman, a native of suburban Cleveland, said.

    Flying Horse Farms will serve children from Ohio and surrounding states, creating a fun, safe and supportive camp experience for children as well as providing free support services and retreats for the entire family. Visit Association of Hole in the Wall Camps Web site.

    "As we work to build Flying Horse Farms with the inspiration from Paul Newman, we are blessed to have had Graham's foresight to have this tribute helmet designed to benefit the camp," said Mark Bivenour, CEO of Flying Horse Farms. "We are only sorry that Mr. Newman won't be able to see the fruits of this auction, but we know his spirit will be with each camper. And many thanks to the anonymous winning helmet bidder for their generous contribution."

    Syracuse Crunch honours Newman by retiring late actor's "Slap Shot" jersey

    The No. 7 that Paul Newman wore as Reg Dunlop in the cult hockey comedy “Slap Shot” is going to the rafters of the Syracuse War Memorial.

    The Syracuse Crunch announced Tuesday that the team will pay tribute to the late actor by raising a banner before Saturday’s American Hockey League game against the Rochester Americans. The banner will stay there for the entire season.

    Crunch president Howard Dolgon says it’s appropriate Newman’s legacy should be recognized and honoured in the arena where parts of the legendary movie were filmed in 1977.

    Newman died last month at age 83 after a battle with cancer.

    A video tribute to Newman’s role in “Slap Shot” will be shown during the ceremony.

    Several Tributes To Atlantic Team Owner Paul Newman at Road Atlanta Season Finale

    Throughout the week leading up to this afternoon's Cooper Tires Presents The Atlantic Championship Powered by Mazda season finale at Road Atlanta, teams and drivers in the series have been paying tribute to Newman Wachs Racing co-owner Paul Newman, who passed away last Friday at the age of 83.

    Every car in the Atlantic field is carrying special decals with Newman's initials, "PLN," and Newman Wachs Racing drivers Jonathan Summerton and Simona De Silvestro have also been wearing "PLN" patches on their firesuits. Prior to this afternoon's season finale, a moment of silence will be observed for Newman, and a special remembrance is also planned for this evening's Awards Banquet at the Chateau Elan Resort & Winery.

    "Paul Newman was a racing icon, and we were fortunate to count him as a team owner and friend in the Atlantic Championship," said Atlantic Championship President Vicki O'Connor. "Our hearts obviously go out to Paul's partner, Eddie Wachs, the Newman Wachs Racing team, and all of Paul's many friends and family as they continue to deal with this loss. We hope our tributes will provide some comfort to them."

    A long-time racing driver and team owner, as well as an Academy Award-winning actor, Newman joined forces with Wachs to field an Atlantic Championship team for the first time in 2006. Now in its third season of Atlantic competition, the team celebrated its first series victory with De Silvestro in the 2008 season-opener at Long Beach driving the No. 34 Nuclear Clean Air Energy/NEI/Entergy entry. Summerton has since added two wins--at Edmonton and Road America--and will start this afternoon's race from the pole position in the No. 36 Nuclear Clean Air Energy/NEI/Entergy machine. Summerton could bring the team its first Atlantic Championship title, as he enters the race trailing points leader Jonathan Bomarito by just seven points.

    Broadway Lights Dim for Paul Newman

    Broadway is giving its regards to Paul Newman. Talk about a switcheroo.

    The Great White Way will pay tribute to the late acting legend by dimming the lights on the marquees of all Broadway theaters on Friday night at 8 p.m. The venues will remain dark for one minute.

    While most acclaimed for his screen work, Newman was no stranger to the boards, making his Broadway debut in 1953 in Picnic, where he met his future wife, Joanne Woodward.

    As recently as 2003, Newman received a Tony Award nomination for his role in Our Town, a role that also earned him an Emmy nod after the play aired on television.

    "For over half a century Paul Newman has graced our stages and inspired our souls with his brilliant talent," said Charlotte St. Martin, the executive director of the Broadway League.

    "After beginning his illustrious career on stage, his love for theater continued throughout his life as demonstrated by the Newman family's support of the renowned Westport Country Playhouse. Off-stage, his tireless devotion to philanthropic work has enhanced many lives and worthwhile causes.

    "His presence everywhere will be missed."

    John Mayer Pays Tribute to Paul Newman

    Move over, Kevin Bacon. John Mayer has his own celebrity name game – and Paul Newman is the undisputed champ.

    The singer-songwriter recently took to his blog to explain the game and, more importantly, to honor the late screen legend.

    "I used to play this game with my friends where we'd try and figure out who the 'heaviest' legend was in terms of having the clout to bump another superstar from a reservation at a packed restaurant on a Saturday night," Mayer wrote. "It starts to get fun when ... [you're] bickering about whether Robert De Niro bumps Bob Dylan, or Springsteen bumps Bono."

    But the game "quickly runs out of steam," he noted, "when you realize that nobody can top Paul Newman."

    Mayer, who turns 31 in two weeks, signed off with an emphatic salute to the blue-eyed icon: "Nobody will ever be that cool again."

    News Archive